Yeah, but it was about as imaginative as keeping Yosemite

 
It almost got lost, too, but for the work of a bunch of elderly library lovers a couple of years ago.

Now on to the rest of the building. The Institutionalists have been chomping at the bit to turn the joint into background space. Still.

They never give up, either. They’ve already gutted the circulating collection across the street.

 

 

The NYPL’s two grandest rooms are now New York City landmarks

 

By AUDREY WACHS (@GRIDWACHS) • August 8, 2017

Today the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) added two stunning rooms in the main branch library to its roster of interior landmarks.

The New York Public Library’s (NYPL) main branch in Midtown Manhattan is a definitive New York building. The structure, built on the site of a former reservoir, commands a block-wide slice of 42nd Street between 5th and 6th avenues. Architects Carrère & Hastings spared no detail, especially on the inside, where a happy Beaux Arts explosion of arched windows, rosettes, ceiling murals, skylights, and brass chandeliers have sheltered writers and learners since 1911. It’s officially known as the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, and its grand interior is mostly unprotected.

One of the best-known rooms, the Rose Main Reading Room, was designated today, as well as the Bill Blass Catalogue Room. These spaces will join the main entrance and primary public spaces that lead up to the main rooms as interior landmarks. (The building’s exterior was protected 50 years ago.)

The designation comes in the middle of a renovations spell at the library. With architects at the Dutch firm Mechanoo, the NYPL has just started work on the Mid-Manhattan Library, an adjacent branch, while renovations on the Schwarzman Building by the same architect have yet to be announced. The Schwarzman Building’s main room and catalogue room, both on the third floor, re-opened to the public last year after extensive revamps that brought a dead-on replica of the original sky mural to the catalogue room.

The LPC convened in July to discuss those two rooms, but held off on a vote at that meeting. Although seven parties spoke in support of the designation last time, there was no public testimony at today’s meeting.

 
Why can’t Burbank have a Bill Blass something?

More than a few of these posts have been written there, btw. And they don’t record your entry (yet).
 
 

 
That’s only half of it.
 
 
 

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